allthingseurope:

Kirjufellsfoss, Iceland (by Óli.)

allthingseurope:

Kirjufellsfoss, Iceland (by Óli.)


septagonstudios:

Sophie Corrigan
Anatomy of a Grumpy Kitty

septagonstudios:

Sophie Corrigan

Anatomy of a Grumpy Kitty


poopypizza:

Greetings from Wrocław, Poland  (at Bema Café)

poopypizza:

Greetings from Wrocław, Poland (at Bema Café)


bittersweetart:

This is THE BEST weather! Pouring down summer rain. *goes out dancing in it* #rain #rainrainrain!

Update: now thoroughly soaked! \o/

bittersweetart:

This is THE BEST weather! Pouring down summer rain. *goes out dancing in it* #rain #rainrainrain!

Update: now thoroughly soaked! \o/

fuckyeahtattoos:

My first tattoo, a wolf head on my thigh. Done by Brynn Sladky at Blacklist Tattoo in Portland, Oregon.

fuckyeahtattoos:

My first tattoo, a wolf head on my thigh. Done by Brynn Sladky at Blacklist Tattoo in Portland, Oregon.


reginasworld:

Aya Nishimura Food Styling

reginasworld:

Aya Nishimura Food Styling


reginasworld:

On the train tracks in Lisbon by Artur Bordalo



thenewenlightenmentage:

Galaxies That Are Too Big To Fail, But Fail Anyway
Dark matter exists, but there is still a lot we don’t know about it. Presumably it’s some kind of particle, but we don’t know how massive it is, what forces it interacts with, or how it was produced. On the other hand, there’s actually a lot we do know about the dark matter. We know how much of it there is; we know roughly where it is; we know that it’s “cold,” meaning that the average particle’s velocity is much less than the speed of light; and we know that dark matter particles don’t interact very strongly with each other. Which is quite a bit of knowledge, when you think about it.
Fortunately, astronomers are pushing forward to study how dark matter behaves as it’s scattered through the universe, and the results are interesting. We start with a very basic idea: that dark matter is cold and completely non-interacting, or at least has interactions (the strength with which dark matter particles scatter off of each other) that are too small to make any noticeable difference. This is a well-defined and predictive model: ΛCDM, which includes the cosmological constant (Λ) as well as the cold dark matter (CDM). We can compare astronomical observations to ΛCDM predictions to see if we’re on the right track.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Galaxies That Are Too Big To Fail, But Fail Anyway

Dark matter exists, but there is still a lot we don’t know about it. Presumably it’s some kind of particle, but we don’t know how massive it is, what forces it interacts with, or how it was produced. On the other hand, there’s actually a lot we do know about the dark matter. We know how much of it there is; we know roughly where it is; we know that it’s “cold,” meaning that the average particle’s velocity is much less than the speed of light; and we know that dark matter particles don’t interact very strongly with each other. Which is quite a bit of knowledge, when you think about it.

Fortunately, astronomers are pushing forward to study how dark matter behaves as it’s scattered through the universe, and the results are interesting. We start with a very basic idea: that dark matter is cold and completely non-interacting, or at least has interactions (the strength with which dark matter particles scatter off of each other) that are too small to make any noticeable difference. This is a well-defined and predictive model: ΛCDM, which includes the cosmological constant (Λ) as well as the cold dark matter (CDM). We can compare astronomical observations to ΛCDM predictions to see if we’re on the right track.

Continue Reading

(via zerostatereflex)


thedemon-hauntedworld:

NGC 2174
NGC 2174 lies about 6400 light-years away in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter). It is not part of the much more familiar Orion Nebula, which lies much closer to us. Despite its prime position in a very familiar constellation this nebula is faint and had to wait until 1877 for its discovery by the French astronomer Jean Marie Edouard Stephan using an 80 cm reflecting telescope at the Observatoire de Marseille.
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

thedemon-hauntedworld:

NGC 2174

NGC 2174 lies about 6400 light-years away in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter). It is not part of the much more familiar Orion Nebula, which lies much closer to us. Despite its prime position in a very familiar constellation this nebula is faint and had to wait until 1877 for its discovery by the French astronomer Jean Marie Edouard Stephan using an 80 cm reflecting telescope at the Observatoire de Marseille.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

(via zerostatereflex)